Looking up

The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum

Last Friday, I found myself with two whole hours (two whole hours!!) to simply amble around the very beautiful Victoria and Albert Museum all by myself (all by myself!!). This is something that never happens to me anymore. Ever! Apologies for all of the exclamation marks ... a few days on and I'm still in shock about it. I've not wandered around a museum without a tiny hand pulling at mine and a little voice demanding snacks or that we leave RIGHT NOW! for five years. Five years!! The last time was the Natural History Museum in New York on our last pre-baby trip. Oh, the memories!

But back to Friday. It was a close run thing between the Victoria and Albert Museum and the dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum but the Wedding Dresses exhibition (and the V&A gift shop ... let's be honest) won out. And it was heaven. Two hours of sheer bliss. One hundred and twenty minutes of slow wandering, reading, learning, admiring, looking up, and taking photographs. And yes, a cup of tea and a slice of cake too.

I don't know about you, but for me, one of the biggest draws of the London museums is the buildings themselves. So vast and so beautiful that even the glorious contents within often can't compare. And the ceilings? Oh, the ceilings! Look up! Whenever you perchance to visit, I implore you to look up. You will be afforded the most amazing sights. My iPhone in no way does them justice, but here are a handful of my favourites.

The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum
The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum
The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum
The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum
The Ordinary Lovely: The V&A Museum

The way the light dances through the glass domes is a work of art in itself. I absolutely can't wait to return and with London a mere two hours on the train from Chester, it's a lot more accessible than I originally thought. So here's to more trips to the capital, this year. And maybe, just maybe, I'll brave it with my little two and take them to see their beloved dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum. Brave? Foolhardy? What do you think?